OFF THE SCREEN! INSTALLATIONS

111 S. 4TH AVENUE STOREFRONT

2x2
Holly Fisher
2016 | film/video hybrid
2x2 came about by accident, when Holly Fisher arbitrarily cut together two of her recent short films, Goldfish Variations and Ghostdance for a New Century, each made with different intent and using music by two very different contemporary composers: Lois V Vierk and composer/cellist Ha-Yang Kim. Juxtaposing these two unlikely works highlights differences within one’s sensibilities, but what is more compelling to her is “to shed light on what we have in common. Each of us works within a layered, complex, and quite rigorous language of our own making; my guess is that the three of us hold a deep respect for the audience, and so seek ways within our unique media to create space, agency, and desire whereby each spectator may form her/his own meaning. In no way did I anticipate the spark and mysterious deep resonance I experienced when I put these works together in a single piece. I’ve come to think of 2x2 as my ‘e-motion diptych’ and as a project that miraculously seems to transcend the unique sensibilities of each of us.”

Goldfish Variations (2012) is a playful work comprised of sketches made with a minute of iPhone footage re-envisioned within 24 video layers, and shaped with, against, around, and inspired by the densely textured, continually shifting, tightening, building, and deeply riveting forward motion sound flow of Vierk’s piece “River Beneath the River.”

Ghostdance for a New Century and Kim’s piece LENS were completed independently. “We met a year ago by chance. Kim felt a connection to what was a silent landscape film/video hybrid which had passed through multiple transformations originating from a roll of 8mm film shot while descending Canyon de Chelly, AZ, in 1978. I discovered LENS, set it on my finished cut and with a single shift, the two came together as if intended. Her intense, contemplative, unpredictable, and wide open sound expands the space of my picture exponentially, while my layers of rich desert colors and cyclic imagery likely add a tension to her haunting sound by ‘click,’ counter-point, and ground.”

ANN ARBOR ART CENTER: group exhibition
117 W Liberty St.

Expanded Cinema from the Ann Arbor Film Festival
on view through March 25 | CLOSING RECEPTION - March 24, 3 – 5pm

Indication
Yuan Goangming
Taiwan | 2014 | 6 minute loop | 3-channel video
"Yuan Goangming’s signature work in still photography digitally extracts the human from spaces that are typically teaming with people. For example, his uncanny City Disqualified—Ximen (2002) shows the busiest street corner in Taipei devoid of passersby; likewise, Landscape of Energy—Stillness (2014) features a beach crowded with parasols, but no people. Indication inverts this structure—filling non-space with a line of people. They emerge from a deep, dark background to address the spectators—themselves bathed in darkness—lifting their arms to point, indicate…what? To the unknown or unnoticed? To the future? Or is the point an accusation? The answer surely depends on the specific time and place—here, now, America in 2017." – Markus Nornes, Professor of Asian Cinema, University of Michigan

Moiré Pool
Simon Alexander-Adams and Isaac Levine
2017 | interactive multimedia installation
Moiré Pool is an interactive installation featuring real-time generative sound and visuals that react to the movement of viewers in the space. The focal point of the installation is a circular projection surface, raised a few feet from the floor. The projections consist of iterative patterns that create visual effects similar to moiré patterns—a form of visual interference that often result in mesmerizing visual beat frequencies. The interaction is akin to waiting for a small pond to clear after one has skipped a stone. If viewers stay still, they will see the settling of the original imagery. If they move about, the visuals will ripple and distort based on their motions. Thus, before one has had a chance to fully observe the pattern, it has been altered. The intention is to create a space that rewards stillness and meditative observation, along with action and play.

Wheatfields and the Sea or: How to feel deprived of sensation
Jonathan Rattner and Ayşe Gül Süter
2016 | mixed media installation
Wheatfields and the Sea or: How to feel deprived of sensation is part of a six-month collaborative exchange project between Turkish animator and media artist Ayşe Gül Süter and American film artist Jonathan Rattner. Created during the spring and summer of 2016, during which there were multiple terrorist bombings in Istanbul and Europe, an attempted coup d’etat in Turkey, and several mass shootings in the United States, this work is a reflection on how to process and interact with these acts of violence in our contemporary landscape. Having a conversation with art from the past, including works by Sophie Calle, Winslow Homer, and Antoni Tàpies, this installation includes two 4-minute looped video projections that are displayed with the same sound design.
The first projection (in the Aquarium Gallery), “Part One: Sea” contains a visual of woman staring at an ocean, overlaid with a close-up image of typewriter text rewriting the words “close your eyes.”
The second projection, “Part Two: Wheatfields,” is a long durational shot of a wheat field that is projected onto a silver painting of a wheat field (100x55 inch). The sound design features a layering of audio gathered from both the United States and Turkey and includes samplings of soul music, ocean surf, sounds of someone walking around their home closing and opening windows and doors, street traffic, and an F16 fighter plane.

AQUARIUM GALLERY

Wheatfields and the Sea or: How to feel deprived of sensation
Jonathan Rattner and Ayşe Gül Süter
2016 | mixed media installation 
Wheatfields and the Sea or: How to feel deprived of sensation is part of a six-month collaborative exchange project between Turkish animator and media artist Ayşe Gül Süter and American film artist Jonathan Rattner. Created during the spring and summer of 2016, during which there were multiple terrorist bombings in Istanbul and Europe, an attempted coup d’etat in Turkey, and several mass shootings in the United States, this work is a reflection on how to process and interact with these acts of violence in our contemporary landscape. Having a conversation with art from the past, including works by Sophie Calle, Winslow Homer, and Antoni Tàpies, this installation includes two 4-minute looped video projections that are displayed with the same sound design. 
The first projection (in the Aquarium Gallery), “Part One: Sea” contains a visual of woman staring at an ocean, overlaid with a close-up image of typewriter text rewriting the words “close your eyes.” 
The second projection, “Part Two: Wheatfields,” is a long durational shot of a wheat field that is projected onto a silver painting of a wheat field (100x55 inch). The sound design features a layering of audio gathered from both the United States and Turkey and includes samplings of soul music, ocean surf, sounds of someone walking around their home closing and opening windows and doors, street traffic, and an F16 fighter plane.

ARBOR BREWING COMPANY STOREFRONT

Trinity
Shane Law & Matt Wilken
2017 | digital video, projection (mapping)
From the Greek adjective τρίπτυχον "triptukhon" (“three-fold"),the triptych tells a story that unfolds upon itself.

ENCORE RECORDS STOREFRONT

Peephole Cinema
Laurie O'Brien
“Nearly two hundred years before the invention of cinema, the peepshow was a live show, a closed box with one peephole revealing a hidden “view." It was a form of both visual entertainment and optical experimentation. In the 1800s Edison’s invention of the Kinetoscope gave way to peephole viewing parlors. My cinema uses modern equipment like media players but keeps the one-on-one cinema viewing experience. As a free public art venue it offers a place to explore our sense of curiosity while playing on age-old tensions between public and private, authorized viewing and voyeurism, seeing and being seen. Sarah Klein is a guest programmer.” – LO'B

MICHIGAN THEATER ALLEY

Copiousness of Learning 
Mat Rappaport
Beam light, Morse code, 3D animation and video projection on architecture
Copiousness of Learning was created and exhibited in 2016 as part of the events marking the 500 Year Anniversary of the Jewish Ghetto in Venice, Italy. The work takes its name from a passage in the Italian and Jewish poet Sara Copia Sullam's “Manifesto”. Sara Copia Sullam was an important female poet and writer who lived in Venice in the late 16th and early 17th centuries, a time when Venice was a European center of Jewish culture and the printing industry. In 1671 she was accused of heresy by Baldassarre Bonifacio who had written that Copia Sullam denied the existence of the soul—a serious charge at the time of the Inquisition. In response Copia Sullam penned a Manifesto which was publish and survives to this day. Copiousness of Learning has two components that extend in opposite directions. The first is a video projection, which places into dialog passages from the Copia Sullam Manifesto and quotes from cognitive scientist Donald D. Hoffman’s work on the nature of consciousness. Text is contrasted by animated navigational maps a typology of 3D ships from Venice. While the video loops, a microprocessor-controlled high powered light beams Morse code in the opposite direction. The coded message contains a core passage from Sara Copia Sullam’s Manifesto: “To eliminate any uncertainty about my Own opinion in this regard, it ought to be enough that I remained a Jew. Had I [not] believed, as you say, in the happiness of the other life and were I not afraid of forfeiting it, there would have been no lack of opportunities for me to improve my state by changing my law, a thing known to persons of much authority, who have insistently striven and attempted to do so.”

MICHIGAN THEATER LOBBY

Peephole Cinema
Laurie O'Brien
“Nearly two hundred years before the invention of cinema, the peepshow was a live show, a closed box with one peephole revealing a hidden “view." It was a form of both visual entertainment and optical experimentation. In the 1800s Edison’s invention of the Kinetoscope gave way to peephole viewing parlors. My cinema uses modern equipment like media players but keeps the one-on-one cinema viewing experience. As a free public art venue it offers a place to explore our sense of curiosity while playing on age-old tensions between public and private, authorized viewing and voyeurism, seeing and being seen. Sarah Klein is a guest programmer.” – LO'B

Temporary
Brenda L. Burmeister
“Pitching a tent in a public campground is a performance of demarcating privacy in the hopes of engendering personal, family bonding away from the distractions of the virtual world. As such, a family camping trip in itself is a constructed intimacy which is paralleled by my design of an intimate audience experience within the video tent. However, intimacy and concentration are broken when the spectators enter, aligning artist and audience in our act of intrusion. The implications of my attempts to document families at public camping sites trespassed and interrupted the family’s bonding experience. By choosing to enter and engage in the act of being an audience or documentarian, we splinter images of the families’ collaborative efforts towards privacy.” – BB

NORTH QUAD - SPACE 2435
open hours:
Tues 2pm-6pm
Wed-Fri 10am-6pm
Sat-Sun 10am-4pm

Lasting Synergies
The history of the Ann Arbor Film Festival is inextricably linked with the history of the University of Michigan. With support from the UM Bicentennial Committee and working with designer Melissa Gomis, students in Terri Sarris's Screen Arts course (SAC 304) used ephemera from the Festival archives at UM’s Bentley Historical Library to create an exhibition exploring aspects of the Festival’s history. UM faculty and former student work exhibited at past fests will loop on monitors in the gallery.

Pop-Up Projection Pavillion (PUPP)
The Pop-Up Projection Pavilion, conceived by Peter Sparling and designed by Robert Adams, provides the screen artist and viewer with multiple perspectives, visual counterpoint, and an immersive viewing experience. The PUPP allows for various degrees of opacity, such that bodies shot against greenscreen and floated in black appear at different depths or angles while sharing the same “artificial darkness”. The Third Century Screens Project invites screen artists to make works for the PUPP. Visit www.3c-screens.com.

Out There
Out There is the first Michigan women's animation competition held by the Women's Caucus for Art, Michigan, and the Ann Arbor Film Festival. It features works from promising Michigan artists, including Layla Abdul-Jabbar, Sarah McNamara, and Collin Leix.

Animals Are People II
Since 2015, the Ann Arbor Film Festival has endowed the George Manupelli Award at the Ypsi 24-Hour Film Shootout, given to the participant who demonstrates the most creativity and experimental prowess. The 2016 Manupelli Award winner is Animals Are People II, by Bryan Susalla, Matt Wilken, and Jeremy Liesen.

In Passing
Robert Ziebell
In Passing uses a large woven tapestry to cover a large video monitor. The short video can only be watched by pulling away the tapestry curtain and holding it open to view. As if challenging you to revel what is behind the tapestry itself is a woven image of the Dutch war ship William Rex, Cornelis Moesman that sailed the seas in the late 17th century. Underneath the tapestry the video reveals the horizon of Lake Superior at dusk. A buoy is in the foreground bobbing in the waves. Two separate merchant ships, an old sailing vessel, and a large freighter enter on the horizon line, stage left and stage right, and eventually cross paths. When they intersect, ghost like images appear in the waves. They are of an older gentleman being shaved and an older woman having her hair cut and styled. Unaware of each other, they gaze at the viewer as they are being primped and prepped. Other images of children are laced in as well, and we assume we are watching a life in full. In addition to the sounds of the water and buoy the soundtrack has a poem being recited about loss and the passing of life being read aloud. Much like the image in the museum that the velvet curtain is protecting, the tapestry is a veil covering a metaphor of loss and time spent that in the end is fleeting and now stolen.